Targhee to rock with Hard Working bands

By Jim Stanford on July 18, 2014

Comments: 1 Comment

Dave Schools of Widespread Panic returns to Targhee with Hard Working Americans, a new band fronted by folk singer Todd Snider.

Grand Targhee’s longtime slogan was “Snow from Heaven, Not Hoses.”

This weekend, the notes will fall from the heavens as the Alta, Wyo., resort hosts its 10th annual Targhee Fest. Music fans will flock to higher ground — 8,000 feet of elevation — for a lineup stacked with blues, rock and alt-country.

Blues guitarist Buddy Guy closes tonight, following Benyaro, an acoustic ensemble with local roots; the Neville-Allman supergroup Royal Southern Brotherhood; and Wood Brothers, which teams stand-up bassist Chris (of MM&W) with older brother Oliver on guitar.

Chris Robinson

On Saturday, Targhee presents a marathon slate beginning with jazz duo Charlie Hunter and Scott Amendola, country-rocker Robert Earl Keen, and Amy Helm (daughter of Levon) and the Handsome Strangers. Then the fest kicks into high gear with Widespread Panic bassist Dave Schools and crooner Todd Snider introducing their latest project, Hard Working Americans, followed by Black Crowes singer Chris Robinson’s Brotherhood.

Big Head Todd and the Monsters, long a favorite in northwest Wyoming, closes Saturday. The Colorado band comes full Circle with its debut appearance at Targhee, after many shows at the Mangy Moose and Snow King over the years.

Sunday features a parade of badass female vocalists: Sister Sparrow and the Dirty Birds, Nicki Bluhm and the Gramblers, Trigger Hippy (featuring Joan Osborne with guitarist Jackie Greene and Crowes drummer Steve Gorman) and headliner Tedeschi Trucks Band, fronted by the lovely Susan Tedeschi.

In addition, there will be late-night bands in the Trap Bar, capped by The Hooligans on Sunday. Single-day tickets are $55 Friday and Sunday and $65 Saturday. Camping is available on site at $35 for adults and $16 for kids.

Read More…

Share

Posted under Music, Ski Resorts, Sports

Tags: , , ,

Jackson fans savor World Cup thrills

By Jim Stanford on July 17, 2014

Comments: 4 Comments

Photographs by Wyatt Roscoe; for more, see his blog, Immaculate Chaos.

Story by Miller Resor

World_Cup_Roscoe_1

It ain’t easy to sum up the World Cup. I’ve been back from Brazil for almost two weeks, and piecing together the confluence of soccer fans from six continents and a million perspectives amid the beauty and the chaos of Brazil has made it difficult to write about.

Now that it’s over, I can say smart money was on Germany all along, Brazil never looked that good, and I wish an American (North, South or Central) team had won.

Read More…

Share

Posted under Sports

Tags: ,

Snake flows to be moderately high

By Jim Stanford on May 16, 2014

Comments: 3 Comments

Rounding the bend below Deadman’s Bar is always exciting.

There is still plenty of snow in the mountains, but with ample space to catch it in Jackson Lake, runoff on the Snake River is unlikely to reach historic levels.

That’s the assessment Mike Beus, operations manager for the Bureau of Reclamation, delivered at the agency’s water meeting in Jackson last night. The bureau controls releases at Jackson Lake and Palisades dams to supply water for irrigation in Idaho and prevent floods.

Runoff in the upper Snake basin is projected to be about 130 percent of normal, Beus said. But because of last year’s drought, the uppermost reservoirs are filling slowly. The Jackson Lake reservoir was drawn down to 18 percent of capacity last fall, and Palisades was nearly empty.

The bureau is releasing only 300 cubic feet per second from Jackson Lake Dam; it will double the flow shortly before Memorial Day weekend and increase the release to 2,500 cfs by June 1.

The agency plans to gradually increase the dam release as tributaries drop off, thereby reducing the risk of flooding. The bureau projects a maximum release of just over 5,000 cfs beginning in late June. Once the runoff subsides, the release will be held steady at 2,500 cfs through the end of September.

Read More…

Share

Posted under Economy, Environment, Sports

Tags: , , ,

PPP registration deadline today

By Jim Stanford on March 24, 2014

Comments: Be the first to comment

Conditions could be good for the annual rite of spring.

Competitors and fun-class partiers wishing to participate in the 39th annual Pole Pedal Paddle must sign up today to avoid a $15 late fee.

Register online or at the ski club office upstairs in Snow King Center.

The race will feature a top-to-bottom super-G at Jackson Hole Mountain Resort, 8-k Nordic ski at Shooting Star, 20-mile cycle to the Snake River and 10-mile paddle to the finish at Astoria Hot Springs.

As the News&Guide reported Friday, the bike leg will be split slightly to accommodate the Nordic course layout, with racers pedaling about a mile to begin skate skiing.

The forecast for Saturday is calling for sunshine and a high of 44 degrees.

Participants may compete solo or with a team, in racing or recreation classes. Fun class is judged not on time but by who appears to be having the most fun. It’s not uncommon to have chiseled Olympians racing alongside costumed beer guzzlers.

Cash prizes of up to $500 will be awarded to the top three finishers in racing class (individuals and teams), with gift certificates for rec class. Raffle prizes include a kayak from Rendezvous River Sports and 2014-15 JHMR season pass.

Entry fees are $60 per individual or $45 per team member. Fun class is $80 per team, and family teams are $70.

After the race, awards will be given at Teton Village, and Michael Franti and Spearhead will perform a free concert as part of the Jackson Hole Rendezvous.

Share

Posted under Ski Resorts, Sports

Tags: , , , , ,

February snowfall just shy of record

By Jim Stanford on February 28, 2014

Comments: 7 Comments

Jess McMillan gets a faceful during this month’s near-record snowfall.

With 7 inches of new snow measured this morning in Rendezvous Bowl, February 2014 will go down as the second-snowiest February since record keeping began at the Jackson Hole Ski Area in 1975.

This month has seen 133 inches of snow fall in the Tetons, trailing only the infamous February 1986, when the Headwall slid to Teton Village and a ski patroller died during avalanche control work.

“This is a very close second to an unbelievable year, an unbelievable February,” Bridger-Teton avalanche forecaster Bob Comey says.

The precise amount of snowfall that fell in Rendezvous Bowl in February 1986 will never be known, as the upper mountain was closed for eight days because of avalanche danger. The 129 inches listed on the avalanche center’s website is an estimate, Comey says.

An additional inch of moisture fell in February 1986, and the mid-mountain study plot received 122 inches of snowfall, compared to this month’s 117.

Read More…

Share

Posted under Environment, Ski Resorts, Sports, Weather

Tags: , , , ,